symphony

San Diego Symphony – De Waart Conducts Mahler 4

San Diego Symphony – De Waart Conducts Mahler 4

DELIUS –  “The Walk to the Paradise Garden” from A Village Romeo and Juliet
BARBER –  Knoxville: Summer of 1915, Op. 24
MAHLER – Symphony No. 4 in G Major

Edo de Waart, conductor
Joélle Harvey, soprano

Gustav Mahler’s shortest symphony offers a glimpse of heaven from a child’s point of view. Pre-eminent conductor Edo de Waart, who thrilled San Diego audiences last season with his interpretation of Mahler’s First Symphony, returns to lead the composer’s song-driven Fourth. Guest soprano Joélle Harvey, in her SDSO debut, also sings on Samuel Barber’s haunting and nostalgic snapshot of early 20th century Tennessee, Knoxville: Summer of 1915.

San Diego Symphony – De Waart Conducts Mahler 4

San Diego Symphony – De Waart Conducts Mahler 4

DELIUS –  “The Walk to the Paradise Garden” from A Village Romeo and Juliet
BARBER –  Knoxville: Summer of 1915, Op. 24
MAHLER – Symphony No. 4 in G Major

Edo de Waart, conductor
Joélle Harvey, soprano

Gustav Mahler’s shortest symphony offers a glimpse of heaven from a child’s point of view. Pre-eminent conductor Edo de Waart, who thrilled San Diego audiences last season with his interpretation of Mahler’s First Symphony, returns to lead the composer’s song-driven Fourth. Guest soprano Joélle Harvey, in her SDSO debut, also sings on Samuel Barber’s haunting and nostalgic snapshot of early 20th century Tennessee, Knoxville: Summer of 1915.

San Francisco Symphony – ANDRÁS SCHIFF PLAYS AND CONDUCTS BACH AND MENDELSSOHN

San Francisco Symphony – ANDRÁS SCHIFF PLAYS AND CONDUCTS BACH AND MENDELSSOHN

András Schiff – Conductor and Piano

Jennifer Mitchell – Soprano

Margaret (Peg) Lisi – Mezzo-soprano

Michael Jankosky – Tenor

J.S. Bach – Keyboard Concerto No. 3 in D major

J.S. Bach – Keyboard Concerto No. 4 in A major

 

J.S. Bach – Orchestral Suite No. 3

Mendelssohn – Lobgesang, Opus 52

J.S. Bach was all but forgotten when Felix Mendelssohn launched a full-scale revival of Bach’s music in 1829—two geniuses from different eras whose music captivates, inspires, and reaches deep into the soul. Hear both composers in the hands of the absolutely riveting conductor and pianist András Schiff. “Schiff performed Bach . . . and transformed the huge and well-filled hall into a bowl of rapt silence” (Independent).

San Francisco Symphony – ANDRÁS SCHIFF PLAYS AND CONDUCTS BACH AND MENDELSSOHN

San Francisco Symphony – ANDRÁS SCHIFF PLAYS AND CONDUCTS BACH AND MENDELSSOHN

András Schiff – Conductor and Piano

Jennifer Mitchell – Soprano

Margaret (Peg) Lisi – Mezzo-soprano

Michael Jankosky – Tenor

J.S. Bach – Keyboard Concerto No. 3 in D major

J.S. Bach – Keyboard Concerto No. 4 in A major

 

J.S. Bach – Orchestral Suite No. 3

Mendelssohn – Lobgesang, Opus 52

J.S. Bach was all but forgotten when Felix Mendelssohn launched a full-scale revival of Bach’s music in 1829—two geniuses from different eras whose music captivates, inspires, and reaches deep into the soul. Hear both composers in the hands of the absolutely riveting conductor and pianist András Schiff. “Schiff performed Bach . . . and transformed the huge and well-filled hall into a bowl of rapt silence” (Independent).

San Francisco Symphony – ANDRÁS SCHIFF PLAYS AND CONDUCTS BACH AND MENDELSSOHN

San Francisco Symphony – ANDRÁS SCHIFF PLAYS AND CONDUCTS BACH AND MENDELSSOHN

András Schiff – Conductor and Piano

Jennifer Mitchell – Soprano

Margaret (Peg) Lisi – Mezzo-soprano

Michael Jankosky – Tenor

J.S. Bach – Keyboard Concerto No. 3 in D major

J.S. Bach – Keyboard Concerto No. 4 in A major

 

J.S. Bach – Orchestral Suite No. 3

Mendelssohn – Lobgesang, Opus 52

J.S. Bach was all but forgotten when Felix Mendelssohn launched a full-scale revival of Bach’s music in 1829—two geniuses from different eras whose music captivates, inspires, and reaches deep into the soul. Hear both composers in the hands of the absolutely riveting conductor and pianist András Schiff. “Schiff performed Bach . . . and transformed the huge and well-filled hall into a bowl of rapt silence” (Independent).

San Diego Symphony – Rush Hour Playlist

San Diego Symphony – Rush Hour Playlist

REICH – Excerpt from It’s Gonna Rain
ADÈS – These Premises Are Alarmed
HAYDN – “Introduction” from The Creation
BEETHOVEN – Mvt. I from Symphony No. 1 in C Major, Op. 21
AUCOIN – “Prologue” from Crossing Suite
SAARIAHO – Spins and Spells
RAMEAU – “Entrée de Polymnie” from Les Boréades
MAHLER – “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen” from Rückert Lieder
STRAVINSKY – “The Shrove-Tide Fair” from Petrushka (1947 version)
AUCOIN – “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” from Crossing Suite

Matthew Aucoin, conductor
Rod Gilfry, baritone
Coleman Itzkoff, cello

Los Angeles Opera’s first ever “Artist-in-Residence” Matthew Aucoin (b. 1990) has some music he wants to share with you – from the past, from the present and predicting the future. Internationally acclaimed baritone Rod Gilfry make a special appearance to sing selections from Aucoin’s own opera, Crossing, based on the poetry of Walt Whitman.

San Diego Symphony – The Young Romantics

San Diego Symphony – The Young Romantics

MENDELSSOHN – The Hebrides (Fingal’s Cave)
LISZT – Piano Concerto No. 1
BERLIOZ – Symphonie fantastique

Michael Francis, conductor
Rodolfo Leone, piano

The Romantic movement was launched by the three early innovators on this program, who shook the world and shaped the future with these youthful masterworks – Mendelssohn’s Hebrides Overture, Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1, and Berlioz’ Symphonie fantastique – all originating in the bountiful year of 1830. Michael Francis (Mainly Mozart Festival Music Director) conducts, with rising star pianist Rodolfo Leone.

San Diego Symphony – The Young Romantics

San Diego Symphony – The Young Romantics

MENDELSSOHN – The Hebrides (Fingal’s Cave)
LISZT – Piano Concerto No. 1
BERLIOZ – Symphonie fantastique

Michael Francis, conductor
Rodolfo Leone, piano

The Romantic movement was launched by the three early innovators on this program, who shook the world and shaped the future with these youthful masterworks – Mendelssohn’s Hebrides Overture, Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1, and Berlioz’ Symphonie fantastique – all originating in the bountiful year of 1830. Michael Francis (Mainly Mozart Festival Music Director) conducts, with rising star pianist Rodolfo Leone.

San Diego Symphony – Payare and Weilerstein

San Diego Symphony – Payare and Weilerstein

R. STRAUSS – Don Juan
BRITTEN – Symphony for Cello and Orchestra
SHOSTAKOVICH – Symphony No. 10

Rafael Payare, conductor
Alisa Weilerstein, cello

Music Director Designate Rafael Payare makes his only Jacobs Masterworks appearance this season with acclaimed cellist Alisa Weilerstein and the SDSO’s first-ever performance of Benjamin Britten’s Symphony for Cello and Orchestra. Dmitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 10 was performed months after the death of Stalin, and is a self-reflective composition containing embedded messages of personal identity.

San Diego Symphony – Payare and Weilerstein

San Diego Symphony – Payare and Weilerstein

R. STRAUSS – Don Juan
BRITTEN – Symphony for Cello and Orchestra
SHOSTAKOVICH – Symphony No. 10

Rafael Payare, conductor
Alisa Weilerstein, cello

Music Director Designate Rafael Payare makes his only Jacobs Masterworks appearance this season with acclaimed cellist Alisa Weilerstein and the SDSO’s first-ever performance of Benjamin Britten’s Symphony for Cello and Orchestra. Dmitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 10 was performed months after the death of Stalin, and is a self-reflective composition containing embedded messages of personal identity.